Elizabeth Liles, MD, MCR

Areas of Focus

 

Meet Elizabeth Liles

Beth Liles knows the challenges of being a primary care physician, but as a researcher, she also knows she can help to improve primary care for patients and for doctors. Her research focuses on developing better ways to screen patients for breast and colon cancers.

Biography

Elizabeth (Beth) Liles, MD, MCR, is a Kaiser Permanente Northwest primary care doctor, board certified in internal medicine, who has practiced for more than 12 years. She joined CHR in 2006 as a research fellow, became a clinical investigator in 2009, and became an investigator in 2015.

Dr. Liles’ research focuses on cancer screening and other topics relevant to the practice of primary care medicine. She  previously collaborated on the FIBER Study, a study of a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program in the KPNW health plan. She was also a principal investigator on the MY FIT Study, which compared two Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT) protocols for detecting colorectal cancer and advanced adenomas. Dr. Liles has recently become a co-investigator in the Vaccine Safety Datalink, a collaborative endeavor among several large health plans that use Big Data to evaluate the safety of vaccines currently in use. She also is a site principal investigator for CLOVER, a randomized trial evaluating the effectiveness of a vaccine against Clostridium difficile.

Dr. Liles is keenly interested in improving processes within primary care practice to bring patients closer to needed information and services. A recent project brought health plan stakeholders together in a day-long roundtable discussion to provide feedback on cancer screening decision aids, to help move these tools into clinical practice. A pilot study evaluated the ability of a breast cancer screening decision aid to communicate mammography benefits and risks to women between the ages of 40 and 49. She is a co-investigator on the CHARM study, which identifies individuals at increased risk for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome and Lynch syndrome and provides them genetic testing. Her most recent work in collaboration with Paula Carder at Portland State University focuses on streamlining communication processes occurring between primary care offices and long-term care facilities for older adults.

Since 2009, Dr. Liles has also served as a methodologist with the Kaiser Permanente National Guideline Program, working to create cancer screening, osteoporosis and diabetes guidelines for physicians in the different Kaiser Permanente regions. This work involves reviewing the evidence for clinical practices and collaborating with large groups of stakeholders across Kaiser Permanente to reach decisions about the practices to emphasize.

Dr. Liles earned her medical degree from Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada, and a Master of Clinical Research degree at Oregon Health & Science University.

Selected Publications

 
  • Liles EG, Coronado D, Perrin N, Howell Harte A, Nungesser R, Quigley N, Potter NT, Weiss G, Koenig T, deVos T. Uptake of a colorectal cancer screening blood test is higher than of a fecal test offered in clinic: A randomized trial. Cancer Res Treatment Comm. 2017; 10:27-31.
  • Hornbrook MC, Goshen R, Choman E, O'Keeffe-Rosetti M, Kinar Y, Liles EG, Rust KC. Early Colorectal Cancer Detected by Machine Learning Model Using Gender, Age, and Complete Blood Count Data. Dig Dis Sci. 2017 Oct;62(10): 2719-2727. doi: 10.1007/s10620-017-4722-8. Epub 2017 Aug 23. Erratum in: Dig Dis Sci. 2017 Nov 27. PubMed PMID: 28836087.
  • Garner P, Hopewell S, Chandler J, MacLehose H, Schünemann HJ, Akl EA, Beyene J, Chang S, Churchill R, Dearness K, Guyatt G, Lefebvre C, Liles B, Marshall R, Martínez García L, Mavergames C, Nasser M, Qaseem A, Sampson M, Soares-Weiser K, Takwoingi Y, Thabane L, Trivella M, Tugwell P, Welsh E, Wilson EC, Schünemann HJ; Panel for updating guidance for systematic reviews (PUGs). When and how to update systematic reviews: consensus and checklist. BMJ. 2016 Jul 20;354:i3507.
  • Liles EG; Schneider JL; Feldstein AC; Mosen DM; Perrin N; Rosales AG; Smith DH. Implementation challenges and successes of a population-based colorectal cancer screening program: a qualitative study of stakeholder perspectives. Implement Sci 2015;10(1):41 [Epub 2015-03-29] PMCID: PMC4391591
  • Mosen DM; Liles EG; Feldstein AC; Perrin N; Rosales AG; Keast E; Smith DH. Participant uptake of the fecal immunochemical test decreases with the two-sample regimen compared with one-sample FIT. Eur J Cancer Prev 2014 Nov;23(6):516-23. PMCID: PMC4186737
  • Lee JK, Liles EG, Bent S, Levin TR, Corley DA. Accuracy of fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis. Ann Intern Med 2014 Feb 4;160(3):171. PMCID: PMC4189821
  • Mosen DM, Feldstein AC, Perrin N, Rosales AG, Smith DH, Liles EG, Schneider JL, Myers RE, Elston-Lafata J. More comprehensive discussion of CRC screening associated with higher screening. Am J Manag Care 2013 Apr;19(4):265-71. PMCID: PMC3891849
  • Smith DH, Feldstein AC, Perrin N, Rosales AG, Mosen DM, Liles EG, Schneider JL, Lafata JE, Meyers RE, Glasgow RE. Automated telephone calls to enhance colorectal cancer screening: economic analysis. Am J Manag Care 2012 Nov;18(11):691-9. PMCID: PMC3845657
  • Liles EG; Perrin N; Rosales AG; Feldstein AC; Smith DH; Mosen DM; Schneider JL. Change to FIT increased CRC screening rates: evaluation of a US screening outreach program. Am J Manag Care 2012 Oct;18(10):588-95.PMCID: PMC3631273
  • Feldstein A, Perrin N, Liles E, Smith DH, Rosales AG, Schneider JL, Lafata JE, Myers RE, Mosen DM, Glasgow RE. Primary care colorectal cancer screening recommendation patterns: Associated factors and screening outcomes. Medical Decis Making 2012 Jan-Feb;32(1):198-208 [Epub 2011 Jun 7] PMCID: PMC3624016
  • Mosen D, Feldstein A, Perrin N, Rosales AG, Smith DH, Liles E, Schneider J, Lafata JE, Myers R, Kositch M, Glasgow RE. Automated telephone calls improved completion of fecal occult blood testing. Med Care 2010 Jul;48(7):604-10 [Epub 2010 May 26] PMCID: PMC3738295
  • Whitlock EP, Lin J, Liles E, Beil T, Fu R. Screening for colorectal cancer: A targeted, updated systematic review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Ann Intern Med 2008;149(9):638-58.
  • Liles E. Discussing screening with patients: Bridging uncertainty in a sea of evidence. SGIM Forum. J Gen Intern Med April 2007 (suppl.)

Press Release

Simple, At-Home Test Will Detect Most Colorectal Cancers

Tests that require patients to collect a single stool sample at home and then send it to a lab for analysis will detect about 79 percent of colorectal cancers, according to a new evidence review published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Feb. 3, 2014

Press Release

Visiting the Doctor Boosts Colon Cancer Screening Rates

Patients who visited their doctor for any reason were nearly six times more likely to be screened for colon cancer compared to those who didn’t visit their doctor, according to a study funded by the National Cancer Institute and published online today in the American Journal of Managed Care.

Apr. 29, 2013