Gregory N. Clarke, PhD

Distinguished Investigator,
Associate Director, Science Programs

Areas of Focus

 

Biography

Greg Clarke, PhD, has conducted mental health research for more than 30 years. His research primarily focuses on the prevention and treatment of depression, anxiety, and insomnia in adults and youth, as well as on population-level mental health improvement through e-health interventions (e.g., websites, mobile devices).

Dr. Clarke has been the principal investigator and co-investigator on more than a dozen grants funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, conducting controlled-outcome trials of depression treatment and prevention in at-risk populations. His current work addresses the prevention of suicidal behaviors and deaths in at-risk youth and adults, treatment of insomnia in depressed youth to improve mood outcomes, internet self-care programs for depressed adults and adolescents, the use of cognitive bias modification (CBM) via a mobile app to treat youth anxiety, the medication and psychotherapy treatment of depression in adolescents who have failed to respond to an initial antidepressant medication, the simultaneous insomnia treatment and antidepressant medication for depressed youth, and treatment of youth and young adults with high suicide risk.

Dr. Clarke received his PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Oregon. He joined the Center for Health Research in 1996.

Selected Publications

 
  • Dickerson JF, Lynch FL, Leo MC, DeBar LL, Pearson J, Clarke GN. Cost-effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy for depressed youth declining antidepressants. Pediatrics. 2018 Feb;141(2). pii: e20171969. PMCID: PMC5810604 [Available on 2019-02-01]
  • Brent DA, Brunwasser SM, Hollon SD, Weersing VR, Clarke GN, Dickerson JF, Beardslee WR, Gladstone TR, Porta G, Lynch FL, Iyengar S, Garber J. Effect of a cognitive-behavioral prevention program on depression 6 years after implementation among at-risk adolescents: A randomized clinical trial. JAMA Psychiatry. 2015 Nov;72(11):1110-8. PMCID: PMC4635056
  • Clarke G, McGlinchey EL, Hein K, Gullion CM, Dickerson JF, Leo MC, Harvey AG. Cognitive-behavioral treatment of insomnia and depression in adolescents: A pilot randomized trial. Behav Res Ther. 2015; 69:111-8. PMCID: PMC4418229
  • Garber J, Clarke GN, Weersing VR, Beardslee WR, Brent DA, Gladstone TR, DeBar LL, Lynch FL, D’Angelo E, Hollon SD, Shamseddeen W, Iyengar S. Prevention of depression in at-risk adolescents: A randomized controlled trial. JAMA. 2009 Jun 3; 301(21):2215-24. PMCID: PMC2737625
  • Clarke G, Kelleher C, Hornbrook M, Debar L, Dickerson J, Gullion C. Randomized effectiveness trial of an Internet, pure self-help, cognitive behavioral intervention for depressive symptoms in young adults. Cogn Behav Ther. 2009; 38(4):222-34. PMCID: PMC2829099
  • Brent D, Emslie G, Clarke G, Wagner KD, Asarnow JR, Keller M, Vitiello B, Ritz L, Iyengar S, Abebe K, Birmaher B, Ryan N, Kennard B, Hughes C, DeBar L, McCracken J, Strober M, Suddath R, Spirito A, Leonard H, Melhem N, Porta G, Onorato M, Zelazny J. Switching to another SSRI or to venlafaxine with or without cognitive behavioral therapy for adolescents with SSRI-resistant depression: The TORDIA randomized controlled trial. JAMA. 2008 Feb 27; 299(8):901-13. PMCID: PMC2277341
  • Clarke G, Debar L, Lynch F, Powell J, Gale J, O'Connor E, Ludman E, Bush T, Lin EH, Von Korff M, Hertert S. A randomized effectiveness trial of brief cognitive-behavioral therapy for depressed adolescents receiving antidepressant medication. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Sep; 44(9):888-98. PubMed PMID: 16113617
  • Clarke G, Eubanks D, Reid E, Kelleher C, O'Connor E, DeBar LL, Lynch F, Nunley S, Gullion C. Overcoming Depression on the Internet (ODIN) (2): A randomized trial of a self-help depression skills program with reminders. J Med Internet Res. 2005 Jun 21; 7(2):e16. PMCID: PMC1550641

Press Release

Counseling in Primary Care Clinics Helps Speed Recovery for Depressed Teens

Kaiser Permanente study highlights benefit of cognitive behavioral therapy for teens who decline antidepressants. Depressed teenagers who received cognitive behavioral therapy in their primary care clinic recovered faster, and were also more likely to recover, than teens who did not receive the primary care-based counseling, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the journal Pediatrics.

Apr. 20, 2016

Story

New Online Tool Helps Patients Manage Depression

A new online tool is helping people with depression improve their mood, change their thinking patterns and feel better over time.

Jan 30, 2014