Sheila Weinmann, PhD, MPH

Senior Investigator

Areas of Focus

 

Biography

Sheila Weinmann, PhD, MPH, is an epidemiologist whose research focuses on cancer etiology, screening, and progression, with an emphasis on molecular epidemiology. Her interests also include pharmacoepidemiology and infectious disease epidemiology.

Dr. Weinmann has more than 25 years’ experience leading cohort and case-control epidemiologic studies at the Center for Health Research and at the University of Washington. She is presently the principal investigator of a grant to study statins in relation to breast cancer recurrence.  She serves on the Leadership Team for the national Kaiser Permanente Research Bank, which ultimately will include the electronic health record information, biospecimen material, and health questionnaire data of 500,000 consenting KP members. The goal of this biobank is to build a world-class resource to contribute to breakthroughs in medical knowledge.

Dr. Weinmann has been the principal investigator on epidemiologic studies of molecular factors in relation to breast cancer recurrence, prostate cancer screening efficacy, molecular and other factors in relation to prostate cancer mortality after prostatectomy, statin use in relation to prostate cancer recurrence, renal cell cancer risk factors, the molecular biology of renal cell cancer progression, and pregnancy outcomes after surgical treatment for cervical dysplasia.

She has also conducted research on cervical, bladder, and colorectal cancers, varicella, herpes zoster, human papillomavirus (HPV), invasive pneumococcal disease, pertussis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and primary cardiac arrest.

Dr. Weinmann received her PhD in epidemiology from the University of Washington. She is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine of Oregon Health & Science University. She is former executive director of the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board and has worked on several studies of health problems among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Selected Publications

 
  • Schauer DP, Feigelson HS, Koebnick C, Caan B, Weinmann S, Leonard AC, Powers JD, Yenumula PR, Arterburn DE. Obesity (Silver Spring). Association between weight Loss and the risk of cancer after bariatric surgery. 2017 Nov;25 Suppl 2:S52-S57. doi: 10.1002/oby.22002. PMID: 29086527 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
  • Habbema D, Weinmann S, Arbyn M, Kamineni A, Williams AE, M C M de Kok I, van Kemenade F, Field TS, van Rosmalen J, Brown ML. Harms of cervical cancer screening in the United States and the Netherlands. Int J Cancer. 2017 Mar 1;140(5):1215-1222. doi: 10.1002/ijc.30524 PMID: 27864938 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
  • Weinmann S, Naleway A, Swamy G, Krishnarajah G, Arondekar B, Fernandez J, Myers E. PLoS One. Pregnancy outcomes after treatment for cervical cancer precursor lesions: An observational study. 2017 Jan 4;12(1):e0165276. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0165276. eCollection 2017. Erratum in: PLoS One. 2017 Feb 13;12 (2):e0172417. PMID: 28052083 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
  • Weinmann S, Williams AE, Kamineni A, Buist DS, Masterson EE, Stout NK, Start A, Ross TR, Owens CL, Field TS, Doubeni CA. Cervical cancer screening and follow-up in 4 geographically diverse US health care systems, 1998 through 2007. Cancer 2015 Sep 1;121(17):2976-83.
  • Weinmann S, Van Den Eeden SK, Haque R, Chen C, Richert-Boe K, Schwartzman J, Gao L, Berry DL, Kallakury BV, Alumkal JJ. Immunohistochemical expression of ERG in the molecular epidemiology of fatal prostate cancer study. Prostate 2013; 73(13):1371-7. PMCID: PMC3745520
  • Doubeni, Annals of Internal Medicine Doubeni CA, Weinmann S, Adams K, Kamineni A, Buist DS, Ash AS, Rutter CM, Doria-Rose VP, Corley DA, Greenlee RT, Chubak J, Williams A, Kroll-Desrosiers AR, Johnson E, Webster J, Richert-Boe K, Levin TR, Fletcher RH, Weiss NS. Screening colonoscopy and risk for incident late-stage colorectal cancer diagnosis in average-risk adults: a nested case-control study. Ann Intern Med 2013; 158(5 Pt 1):312-20. PMCID: PMC3752391
  • Weinmann S, Shapiro JA, Rybicki BA, Enger SM, Van Den Eeden SK, Richert-Boe KE, Weiss NS. Medical history, body size, and cigarette smoking in relation to fatal prostate cancer. Cancer Causes Control 2010 Jan;21(1):117-25. Epub 2009 Oct 9. PMID:19816779
  • Weinmann S, Richert-Boe KE, Van Den Eeden SK, Enger SM, Rybicki BA, Shapiro JA, Weiss NS. Screening by prostate-specific antigen and digital rectal examination in relation to prostate cancer mortality: a case-control study. Epidemiology 2005 May; 16(3):367-76. PMID: 15824554
  • Chun CS, Weinmann S, Riedlinger K, Mullooly JP. Passive cigarette smoke exposure and other risk factors for invasive pneumococcal disease in children: A case-control study. Perm J 2015 Winter;19(1):38-43. [Epub 2014 Nov 24] PMCID: PMC4315375
  • Weinmann S, Chun C, Schmid DS, Roberts M, Vandermeer M, Riedlinger K, Bialek SR, Marin M. Incidence and clinical characteristics of herpes zoster among children in the varicella vaccine era, 2005-2009. J Infect Dis 2013 Dec;208(11):1859-68.
  • Weinmann S, Vollmer WM, Breen V, Heumann M, Hnizdo E, Villnave J, Doney B, Graziani M, McBurnie MA, Buist AS. COPD and occupational exposures: a case-control study. J Occup Environ Med 2008 May;50(5):561-569.
  • Weinmann S, Siscovick DS, Raghunathan TE, Arbogast P, Smith H, Bovbjerg VE, Cobb LA, Psaty BM. Caffeine intake in relation to the risk of primary cardiac arrest. Epidemiology 1997 Sep;8(5):505-8. PMID: 9270951

Press Release

Donating DNA to Change the Future of Health Care

Launched in 2016, the KP Research Bank is positioned to become one of the world’s most important resources for genetic research.

Sep 20, 2017

Stories

Dental-Medical Integration: An Innovative Approach to Immunizations

The Dental Care Program at Kaiser Permanente Northwest proves to be a great laboratory for immunization research.

Dec 13, 2016

Press Release

Twelve-Year Study Suggests Procedures to Prevent Cervical Cancer Do Not Affect Fertility

Common surgical procedures used to diagnose and treat precancerous cervical lesions do not decrease women’s chances of becoming pregnant, according to a study that followed nearly 100,000 women for up to 12 years.

Feb 11, 2015